What Is an Ultrasound Used For?

What Is an Ultrasound Used For?

What Is an Ultrasound Used For?

The ultrasound has been around for many years, and doctors have come to rely on the technology to save lives. The ultrasound machine is a mainstay of hospitals and clinics around the world and an invaluable piece of medical equipment. It’s used in emergency rooms, small clinics, and doctors’ offices to help doctors and technicians diagnose patients. The ultrasound machine uses focused sound waves to penetrate the skin, bounce off internal structures, and return to the transponder. The computer calculates how fast the waves return and creates an image. Most people associate the ultrasound with pregnant mothers and monitoring babies and predicting gender, but they can do more. Read on to find out what an ultrasound is used for.

Diagnostics

Diagnostics is an umbrella term that accurately applies to the ultrasound machine, which is used to diagnose patients with a wide variety of ailments and diseases. Using an ultrasound machine, doctors can find out what’s wrong with a patient in a noninvasive way, meaning they can see inside the patient without having to make an incision. With this technology, doctors can see tumors, muscle strains, and internal organs. Plus, an ultrasound is more portable than X-rays and more valuable in an emergency setting.

Prenatal Checks

One of the very first ultrasounds was used to see a pregnant woman’s baby, and obstetricians and gynecologists have used ultrasound machines ever since. The ability to view a baby in utero is extremely valuable to everyone involved. The doctor can see how the baby is developing, if they’re positioned correctly, and whether the cord is wrapped, and they can even determine the gender ahead of time. Expectant mothers usually have two sonograms during their pregnancies, but if the mother is high-risk, the doctor can order more.

Finding Breaks

In cases of severe bone breaks, there’s usually little doubt where the break is and what bone is broken. However, another thing an ultrasound is used for is to help doctors find stress fractures and mild breaks that aren’t as obvious. The ultrasound can find tiny breaks and fractures that might not otherwise go undetected. The exam works the same as any other: the technician moves the probe around the desired area to produce an image.

Healing

Patients often seek out alternative methods for dealing with pain. They may not want medication, preferring to solve the problem rather than mask the pain. Some ultrasound machines, such as the Philips IU22, can help patients deal with chronic muscle or back pain and arthritis. The soundwaves coming from the probe vibrate the muscles and promote healing.

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